ttttrovato
ttttrovato
+
(via UNIQLO RECIPE)
+
http://nativeshoes.com
+
http://v.isits.in
+
https://www.mapbox.com
+
(via Bustler: 2014 AIA Institute Honor Awards recipients - Interior Architecture)
+
vizualize:

Swissair – DC7c Seven Seas
Design: Kurt Wirth
via: Johnatan Turner
vizualize:

Swissair – DC7c Seven Seas
Design: Kurt Wirth
via: Johnatan Turner
+
kateoplis:

"Kazi drives a Toyota Prius for Uber in Los Angeles. He hates it. He barely makes minimum wage, and his back hurts after long shifts. But every time a passenger asks what it’s like working for Uber, he lies: “It’s like owning my own business; I love it.” Kazi lies because his job depends on it. After passengers finish a ride, Uber asks them to rate their driver on a scale from one to five stars. Drivers with an average below 4.7 can be deactivated — tech-speak for fired.
In fact, if you ask Uber drivers off the clock what they think of the company, it often gets ugly fast. …In LA, San Francisco, Seattle, and New York, tension between drivers and management has bubbled over in recent months. And even though Uber’s business model discourages collective action (each worker is technically in competition with each other), some drivers are banding together.”
“It won’t be easy. Drivers are going up against a burgeoning goliath valued at around $18 billion. The company just hired David Plouffe, who managed Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns; it’s active in 130 cities; and if company executives are to be believed, it doubles its revenue every six months.”
“They think we are a bunch of losers who can’t find better jobs,” DeWolf said. “That’s why they treat us like robots — like we are replaceable.”
Uber, of course, disputes this characterization. “Uber succeeds when our partner-drivers succeed,” Behrend said.
But that is just empty spin: drivers aren’t partners — they are laborers exploited by their company. They have no say in business decisions and can be fired at any time. Instead of paying its employees a wage, Uber just pockets a portion of their earnings. Drivers take all the risks and front all the costs — the car, the gas, the insurance — yet it is executives and investors who get rich.
Uber is part of a new wave of corporations that make up what’s called the “sharing economy.” The premise is seductive in its simplicity: people have skills, and costumers want services. Silicon Valley plays matchmaker, churning out apps that pair workers with work. Now, anyone can rent out an apartment with AirBnB, become a cabbie through Uber, or clean houses using Homejoy.
But under the guise of innovation and progress, companies are stripping away worker protections, pushing down wages, and flouting government regulations. At its core, the sharing economy is a scheme to shift risk from companies to workers, discourage labor organizing, and ensure that capitalists can reap huge profits with low fixed costs.
There’s nothing innovative or new about this business model. Uber is just capitalism, in its most naked form.”
Against Sharing
art: Jeremey Mann

under the guise of innovation and progress, companies are stripping away worker protections, pushing down wages, and flouting government regulations. At its core, the sharing economy is a scheme to shift risk from companies to workers, discourage labor organizing, and ensure that capitalists can reap huge profits with low fixed costs.
+
(via Constellations Bar by H Miller Bros is a courtyard canopy in Liverpool)
+
(via Juxtapoz Magazine - “Calculation” Drawings by Rafael Araujo)
+
kateoplis:

Meet me here.
kateoplis:

Meet me here.
kateoplis:

Meet me here.
+
riccardoguasco:

"Caffè macchiato Calder"
Riccardo Guasco 2014
ink on paper
A lesson
+
+
vizualize:

dynamics of vesica piscis
+
"Rotis. Considered by all living professional type-designers to be a collection of beautiful letters that never combine to form legible sentences, Rotis is a mannered expression of a graphic designer’s theories that sound good but simply do not work"
Erik Spiekermann about Rotis Should Architects Understand Type?: Design Observer (via suspectdevice)